Financial News

Friday, June 25th
June 24, 2021
AP-NC Newswatch
June 24, 2021
Financial News

 

 

World shares mostly up…Breakthrough agreement?

 

BANGKO ((asterisk)AP) – World shares are mostly higher today as investors await new U.S. inflation data. In early trading in Europe, Germany’s DAX gained 0.6%, the CAC 40 in Paris picked up 0.7% and Britain’s FTSE 100 added 0.2%. In Asian trading, Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 index was flat and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng closed 0.2% higher. In Seoul, the Kospi added 0.3% and the Shanghai Composite index was virtually unchanged. On Wall Street, Dow and S&P 500 futures are higher.

 

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bipartisan gang of senators is seeking President Joe Biden’s support for a $953 billion infrastructure plan. It’s raising hopes for a breakthrough agreement after arduous negotiations on the president’s top legislative priority. Biden has invited members of the group of 21 senators, Republicans and Democrats, to the White House today. The pared-down plan, with $559 billion in new spending, has rare bipartisan backing and could open the door to the president’s more sweeping $4 trillion proposals.

 

MADRID (AP) – Authorities in Spain say “everything points to death by suicide,” after the creator of McAfee antivirus software was found in his jail cell near Barcelona Wednesday. Hours before 75-year-old John McAfee was found, a Spanish court had approved his extradition to the United States to face tax charges punishable by decades in prison.

 

BERLIN (AP) – A closely-watched survey by Munich’s Ifo institute shows Germany’s businesses are more optimistic than they’ve been in almost three years. Sentiment among German managers rose to 101.8 points in June, from 99.2 in May, its highest since November 2018. The upbeat mood is partly spurred by declining coronavirus infections and the reopening of large parts of the economy.

 

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – U.S. agriculture officials are launching what could become their largest campaign since the 1980s to kill grasshoppers in western states. Ranchers fear the insects will strip bare the public and private rangeland where cattle graze. In central Montana, more than 50 miles from the nearest town, rancher Frank Wiederrick says the grasshoppers “are cleaning us out” and fears he’ll have to sell his cows as the infestation worsens. Scientists say such outbreaks could become more common as climate change shifts rainfall patterns.