AP Sports

Ashe County School Update for Friday, May 8th
May 8, 2020
Mabel Colleen Weaver
May 8, 2020
AP Sports

 

 

Update on the latest sports

 

PARIS (AP) – Discussions on holding Formula One races in July have reached an advanced stage, although F1 chairman Chase Carey cautions that “the remote possibility of no racing in 2020” remains. Carey hopes to start the season at Spielberg, Austria on July 4-5. Other European circuits not on the calendar are also being considered. The first 10 races of the season have been postponed or canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic, leading to a huge loss of revenue. The iconic Monaco Grand Prix was scrapped for the first time in 66 years.

 

UNDATED (AP) – Former ABA commissioner Mike Storen has died. During his four-decade career in sports Storen held executive spots in basketball, football, baseball and tennis. He was general manager of the Indiana Pacers and Kentucky Colonels and president of the Atlanta Hawks. He owned the ABA’s Memphis Sounds, worked for the Cincinnati Royals of the NBA and the Houston Astros. His daughter, ESPN broadcaster Hannah Storm, says Storen died yesterday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta of complications from cancer. He was 84.

 

VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS
While NFL presses ahead with plans for season, CFL likely to cancel
UNDATED (AP) – The NFL is pressing on with plans to hold its season on schedule, while noting that everything has to be considered tentative given the current prohibition on large gatherings.
All 32 teams released their schedules Thursday evening, with the full 2020 list scheduled to be revealed by the league a bit later. The NFL’s annual kickoff game is set for Sept. 10, with Super Bowl champion Kansas City hosting Houston.
Meanwhile, there is less optimism about football in Canada. Canadian Football League Commissioner Randy Ambrosie said Thursday that the most likely scenario is to cancel the season because of the COVID-19 pandemic. He told a House of Commons standing committee on finance that the Canadian league’s future is “very much in jeopardy.” News broke last week that the CFL had requested up to $150 million Canadian in assistance from the federal government.

 

In other developments related to the coronavirus pandemic:
– IndyCar has gotten the green flag to start its season. The first race will be run June 6 without spectators at Texas Motor Speedway. The June season opener will be on a condensed schedule with practice, qualifying and the race taking place on the same day. There will be strict access guidelines limiting the number of personnel on site, with health screening system administered to all participants and personal protection equipment provided to everyone entering the facility. Social distancing protocols will be in place.

 

– Discussions on holding Formula One races in July are progressing, but F1 chairman Chase Carey cautions that “the remote possibility of no racing in 2020” remains. Carey hopes to start the season at Spielberg, Austria on July 4-5. Other European circuits not on the calendar are also being considered. The first 10 races of the season have been postponed or canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic, leading to a huge loss of revenue. The iconic Monaco Grand Prix was scrapped for the first time in 66 years.

 

– Fans returned to the stands Friday for baseball in Taiwan, even though they are spaced far apart as a safeguard against the spread of the coronavirus. Up to 1,000 spectators are now allowed at ballparks in Taiwan but they must sit apart and are barred from bringing in food and concession stands are still closed. Before today’s game between the Fubon Guardians and the UniLions Taiwan’s health and welfare minister appeared at home plate wearing jersey No. 0, an emblem of the government’s hope for zero coronavirus cases.

 

– Soccer is back in South Korea for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic shut down sports around the world, and its success or failure will be closely watched by leagues everywhere. The K-League season kicked off Friday in Jeonju with defending champion Jeonbuk Motors playing in an empty stadium but with chants piped in from supporters. Instead of fans, banners with messages of support were draped around the stands. The hosts beat Suwon Bluewings 1-0 in a match that was broadcast to 36 countries, including Germany, Britain, India and Australia. The game was also shown on YouTube and on the league’s Twitter page.

 

– German politicians have been persuaded to allow soccer to resume in the country despite the coronavirus pandemic, but it seems the public still needs to be convinced. Three new polls from German broadcasters show at least half of respondents saying they are against the plan to restart the season. The top two divisions will resume on May 16 following a two-month suspension, playing in empty stadiums. The decision was made after German Chancellor Angela Merkel (AHN’-geh-lah MEHR’-kuhl) met with state governors on Wednesday and gave their approval.

 

– Soccer teams are going to get some extra help from the bench during a backlog of games caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The International Football Association Board has agreed to let teams use two extra substitutes per match when soccer resumes. Leagues which typically end in May are preparing to restart and face a congested schedule into July and August to complete their season.

 

– The head of China’s football association says teams will implement temporary player pay cuts of 30% to 50% to help teams manage losses from the coronavirus outbreak. The official (Chen Xuyuan) also told state broadcaster CCTV that matches would be resumed on a staggered schedule but gave no specific dates.

 

– Sporting events in Oregon are likely to be without large crowds likely through at least the end of September because of the new coronavirus. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced steps the state is taking in its reopening next week. Brown asked those planning large gatherings to cancel or significantly modify plans for anything scheduled in September.

 

– New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio doesn’t see games returning to Yankee Stadium or Citi Field very quickly, at least not with fans. De Blasio says bigger events are going to be one of the last things that will really fit the equation as the country restarts. He says the perfect time to reopen big events is when the new coronavirus has been “beaten back to next to nothing.”

 

– More than 30 workers have accepted voluntary severance packages from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee. It’s part of the organization’s attempt to trim up to 20% of its expenses in response to shortfalls caused by COVID-19. Furloughs and involuntary layoffs are expected to begin next week.

 

– The televised match involving Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and two of the NFL’s greatest quarterbacks is raising $10 million for COVID-19 relief. Turner Sports is producing the May 24 event that will be simulcast on its networks, including TNT and TBS. Woods and Peyton Manning will take on Mickelson and Tom Brady at Medalist Golf Club.

 

 

AP-WF-05-08-20 1457GMT