AP-NC Newswatch

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June 2, 2022
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June 2, 2022
AP-NC Newswatch

 

Latest North Carolina News:

 

PARENTS’ RIGHTS
NC parents’ bill blocking K-3 LGBTQ curriculum clears Senate
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – The state Senate has passed “Parents’ Bill of Rights” legislation that in part would prohibit instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity in K-3 public school curriculum. The measure cleared the chamber Wednesday on a near party-line vote and now heads to the House. The outcome suggests a likely veto by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper if the bill reaches his desk could doom the Republican measure. The bill’s authors said the legislation was needed to give parents more ability to oversee their children’s’ education and health. But opponents said the measure is an election-year attempt at censorship that would harm LGBTQ students.

 

 

MEDICAID EXPANSION
NC health bill with Medicaid expansion gets first Senate OK
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – The North Carolina Senate has given initial approval to a wide-ranging health care access bill penned by Republicans that would include Medicaid expansion, which GOP lawmakers in the chamber had opposed for years. The Senate voted overwhelmingly Wednesday for the measure, which would provide Medicaid coverage for hundreds of thousands of adults who make too much to qualify for traditional Medicaid. The bill represents a dramatic turn for the prospects for expansion. But the odds appear long that the House will take up the measure before the annual work session ends in about a month. A final Senate vote will occur Thursday.

 

 

INSKO’S REPLACEMENT
NC House primary winner Buansi takes seat, succeeding Insko
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – A local government attorney has joined the North Carolina House. Allen Buansi of Orange County is now a state representative after being picked by Orange County Democratic activists. He’s filling the remainder of the term won last year by veteran Rep. Verla Insko. She decided not to seek reelection and formally resigned this week. Buansi already was poised next January to join the House for a two-year term after winning the 56th House District Democratic primary on May 17. There is no Republican candidate for the district seat this fall. Buansi is an assistant city attorney for Greensboro who recently served on the Chapel Hill town council.

 

 

BUILDING FOR DISASTERS
Here’s how the government wants to disaster-proof your home
MIAMI (AP) – On this first day of the Atlantic hurricane season, federal officials are announcing a new initiative to modernize building codes. They want communities to be more resilient to hurricanes, flooding, wildfires, and other extreme weather events that are intensifying due to climate change. The program being announced at the National Hurricane Center in Miami on Wednesday offers a range of smart design and construction methods for new buildings and homes as well as those being repaired. Officials say they will “save lives, reduce property damage, and lower utility bills.” It will cost more up front, but a study shows the new codes save communities $11 per every $1 invested.

 

 

PANTHERS-PRACTICE FACILITY
Panthers’ practice facility dead after Chapter 11 filing
The Carolina Panthers’ proposed $800 million practice facility project in Rock Hill, South Carolina, is officially dead after team owner David Tepper’s real estate company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Delaware on Wednesday night. Tepper, who made billions in hedge funds, is the NFL’s wealthiest owner. The filing will not affect the NFL’s Panthers or Major League Soccer’s Charlotte FC in any way. It’s unclear at this point what will happen to the half-built practice facility. Tepper has invested more than $175 million into the facility, which is located about 25 miles south of the team’s current downtown stadium and headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina.

 

 

ABORTION PROVIDER EXPANSION
With Roe in doubt, states weigh letting nurses do abortions
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) – As new abortion restrictions are imposed in some parts of the U.S., states with more liberal leadership have been passing laws to let a wider range of medical providers to do the procedures. The goal has been to expand the pool of certified providers, partly to be prepared for a possible influx of out-of-state patients, but also to reduce wait times for in-state patients and improve access for underserved communities. The efforts have taken on new urgency in recent months amid doubt over the durability of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision in another example of diverging state policies on abortion.

 

 

RACIAL INJUSTICE-MINNESOTA-EXTREMISTS
‘Boogaloo’ member sentenced to 4 years on weapons charges
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – The second of two self-described members of an anti-government extremist group accused in Minnesota of dealing firearm components to informants acting as members of Hamas is headed to prison. A federal judge on Wednesday sentenced Benjamin Ryan Teeter, of Hampstead, North Carolina, to four years behind bars. He pleaded guilty in December to one count of conspiracy to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization. Authorities say Teeter and 32-year-old Michael Robert Solomon of New Brighton, Minnesota, sold silencers and other firearm components to FBI informants during the unrest following George’s Floyd’s killing. Solomon was sentenced in March to three years in prison.

 

 

MEDICAL MARIJUANA
Medical pot bill resurfaces in NC Senate, heading to floor
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) – Legislation authorizing marijuana for medical use in North Carolina and developing a system to grow, sell and regulate cannabis is back on the front burner in the Senate. The rules committee approved the measure Wednesday, nine months after it last surfaced. The first floor vote is expected Thursday. The measure would allow patients with at least one of the more than a dozen “debilitating medical conditions” to purchase and use marijuana with their physician’s formal approval. The bill envisions medical cannabis centers operated by state-licensed growers and vendors. Any measure also would have to pass the House, where action appears unlikely this year.