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September 17, 2018
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September 17, 2018
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Latest North Carolina news, sports, business and entertainment at 11:20 a.m. EDT

 

AP-US-TROPICAL-WEATHER-THE-LATEST
The Latest: Authorities recover body of 1-year-old
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) – A North Carolina sheriff’s office says it has recovered the body of a 1-year-old boy who was swept away by floodwaters after his mother lost her grip on him.
The Union County Sheriff’s Office identified the boy on its Facebook page Monday as Kaiden Lee-Welch.
Spokesman Tony Underwood said a woman and her child were on their way to visit relatives when she drove past some barricades on N.C. Highway 218 in northern Union County. The woman later told authorities someone had pushed the barricades to the side a little, making her think it was OK to go through.
The woman’s car was swept off the road by the floodwaters, pinning it against a group of trees. She was able to free 1-year-old Kaiden Lee-Welch from his car seat and escape. But the waters were deep, and Underwood said the woman lost her grip and her son was swept away.

 

 

TROPICAL WEATHER-THE LATEST
The Latest: Child swept away by floodwaters
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) – Authorities are searching for a 1-year-old boy who was swept away by floodwaters in North Carolina after the boy’s mother lost her grip on him.
Union County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Tony Underwood said a woman and her child were on their way to visit relatives when she drove past some barricades on highway 218 in northern Union County. The woman later told authorities someone had pushed the barricades to the side a little, making her think it was OK to go through.
The woman’s car was swept off the road by the floodwaters, pinning it against a group of trees. She was able to free 1-year-old Kaiden Lee-Welch from his car seat and escape. But the waters were deep, and Underwood said the woman lost her grip and her son was swept away.

 

 

TROPICAL WEATHER-TOXIC SITES
Pollution fears: Swollen rivers swamp ash dumps, hog farms
Flooded rivers from Florence’s rains have begun to swamp coal ash dumps and low-lying hog farms in North Carolina, raising pollution concerns as the swollen waterways approach their crests.
Duke Energy says the weekend collapse of a coal ash landfill at the mothballed L.V. Sutton Power Station near the Cape Fear River in Wilmington is an “on-going situation.” At a different power plant near Goldsboro, three old coal ash dumps have been inundated by the Neuse River.
An Associated Press photographer who flew over North Carolina’s Trent River saw several flooded hog farms Sunday. Those typically have large pits of hog urine and feces, but regulators say they’ve no reports so far of any pollution breaches.
Many rivers are forecast to crest Monday at or near record levels.

 

 

TROPICAL WEATHER-DEATH TOLLS
Death tolls often rise weeks after storm hits
It’s not uncommon for death tolls to rise weeks after a natural disaster has hit.
More than six months after Hurricane Irma’s catastrophic rampage across the Caribbean and the southeastern United States, the U.S. National Hurricane Center raised the death toll to 129 – more than twice the amount reported at the end of the storm.
It also took years for Hurricane Katrina’s death toll to become fully known. That number is still debated today with figures used by different agencies varying by as much as 600 deaths.
President Donald Trump has questioned Puerto Rico’s adjusted death toll from the devastating storm last year and said the number rose “like magic.”
Disaster experts say realistic death tolls take time.

 

 

EX-INMATE-FASHION CRIME
Fashion crime: Ex-inmate spotted at mall in jail jumpsuit
(Information from: Winston-Salem Journal, http://www.journalnow.com)
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) – In between New York and London’s fashion weeks, North Carolina made its own ripples in the world of fashion – specifically, jumpsuits.
The Winston-Salem Journal reports a video of a man clad in an orange jumpsuit stamped “Forsyth County Detention Center” at a mall spread this weekend. Chief Deputy Brad Stanley clarified that the man was not an escape or currently wanted.
But it turns out that 57-year-old Mustapha Khallid Muhammad is an outfit repeater. He was jailed last year for failure to appear and comply, and should’ve surrendered the jumpsuit when released Dec. 13.
Stanley says it’s unclear whether Muhammad took the jumpsuit or had one made for himself, but for now, he’s wanted for possession of stolen property. The newspaper didn’t include comment from him.

 

 

TROPICAL WEATHER-WILMINGTON
Road access cut off to N. Carolina city after Florence
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) – Authorities are looking at going by air and water to get food into a North Carolina city that was cut off from road access by Florence’s floodwaters.
Officials say the major highways into the Wilmington area, Interstate 40 and U.S. 74, weren’t accessible Sunday.
State Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon said Sunday that one of his top priorities was determining how to restore ground access to the area.
Trogdon said the state was working with the Department of Defense and National Guard to see if they could get first responders through to Wilmington in high-water vehicles. He also said officials were working on “other contingencies to support Wilmington on the ocean side.”

 

 

TROPICAL WEATHER-TALE OF TWO STORMS
US hurricane, Asian typhoon: 1 brings water, the other, wind
WASHINGTON (AP) – Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut roared ashore the same day half a world apart, but the way they spread devastation was as different as water and wind.
Storms in the western Pacific generally hit with much higher winds and the people who live in their way are often poorer and more vulnerable. Princeton University hurricane scientist Gabriel Vecchi said Saturday that differences in the storms also are likely to determine the type of destruction.
Mangkhut made landfall Friday in the Philippines with 165 mph (265 kph) winds. Florence had 90 mph (145 kph) winds on reaching North Carolina. Fast-moving Magnkhut quickly turn back out to sea, heading toward China. Meanwhile, Florence plodded across the Carolinas slower than a normal person walks, dumping heavy rains and causing severe flooding.