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April 7, 2021
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April 8, 2021
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DISNEY WORLD EASES UP ON MASKING RULE
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – If you’re visiting Walt Disney World and are happy about it, you can now show it. Starting tomorrow, visitors to the Florida theme park will be able to remove their masks – but only briefly. The resort says it will allow people to take off their masks momentarily to take outdoor photos. The rule tweak doesn’t apply to shots taken indoors. Until now, the mask rule said all workers and visitors age 2 and up must wear masks, except when they’re actively eating and drinking.

 

BRITISH ACTOR PAUL RITTER REMEMBERED
LONDON (AP) – While movie fans remember Paul Ritter for his work in Harry Potter and James Bond movies, those who worked with him are remembering Ritter for the kind of man he was. Robert Popper, who worked with Ritter on the British sitcom “Friday Night Dinner,” says Ritter “was a lovely, wonderful human being” in addition to being “the greatest” actor he ever worked with. Ritter is dead at age 54. He had a brain tumor.

 

AARON RODGERS’ FIRST EPISODE AS “JEOPARDY!” HOST ENDS WITH A SURPRISE
UNDATED (AP) – Just about every sports team has a clunker of a play that haunts players and fans for decades. And when Green Bay Packers’ quarterback Aaron Rodgers hosted his first episode of “Jeopardy!,” a contestant reminded him of one of them. When Scott Shewfelt got stumped on Final Jeopardy, he tweaked Rodgers with a reference to a decision that cost the Packers the NFC title game last season. Shewfelt wrote, “Who wanted to kick that field goal?” Rodgers saw the answer, paused and said the question “should be correct” but was wrong as far as Jeopardy was concerned. Rodgers is hosting Jeopardy for two weeks as a guest host replacing Alex Trebek, who died late last year.

 

YOUTUBE KIDS INVESTIGATED BY HOUSE PANEL
UNDATED (AP) – It’s aimed at children But a House subcommittee is asking some grownup questions about YouTube Kids. The Google-owned video channel is coming under fire for unleashing what two lawmakers call “a wasteland of vapid, consumerist content” so it can show ads to kids. The lawmakers say the site hasn’t done enough to shield kids from potentially harmful material. Back in 2019, Google agreed to pay $170 million to settle claims that it collected personal data on kids without parental consent.