AP Entertainment

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October 18, 2018
Friday, October 19th
October 18, 2018
AP Entertainment

 

 

 

AM Prep-Segue

 

PROSECUTORS DISCLOSE MORE MISCONDUCT BY HARVEY WEINSTEIN DETECTIVE

NEW YORK (AP) – New York prosecutors say the former lead police detective in the Harvey Weinstein sexual assault investigation urged one of Weinstein’s accusers to delete information from her phone before turning it over to prosecutors. The Manhattan district attorney’s office detailed the alleged misconduct in a letter to Weinstein’s lawyer that was made public Wednesday. The new allegations against Detective Nicholas DiGaudio involve an unidentified woman who says Weinstein raped her in his Manhattan hotel room in 2013. Prosecutors say the woman didn’t delete any information, which was personal and unrelated to the investigation. DiGaudio was removed from the Weinstein case last week after evidence surfaced that he instructed a witness to keep quiet when she raised doubts about another accuser’s claim of sexual misconduct. There was no immediate response from DiGaudio’s union. That revelation led prosecutors to drop a charge related to that allegation.

 

CAROLL SPINNEY REFLECTS ON BIG BIRD AFTER ANNOUNCING RETIREMENT

WOODSTOCK, Conn. (AP) – Puppeteer Caroll Spinney says he will always be Big Bird — and even Oscar the Grouch, once in a while. Spinney says he’s retiring from “Sesame Street” after filming today (Thursday). Spinney says before he came to “Sesame Street,” he didn’t feel like what he was doing was very important, but Big Bird helped him find his purpose. Spinney, who is 84, gave up operating the puppets three years ago but still does the voices for Big Bird and Oscar. Matt Vogel will take over Big Bird and Eric Jacobson will perform Oscar.

IN STRUGGLING BALTIMORE, POLICE UNION FOCUSES ON COMEDY SKIT

BALTIMORE (AP) – The leadership of Baltimore’s police union isn’t laughing at a “Saturday Night Live” skit. Over the weekend, the NBC comedy show featured a skit where female police officers were shown hitting on a male character during a traffic stop. The city’s force wasn’t mentioned in the spoof but the actresses wore Baltimore police patches on their uniforms. The Baltimore Sun wrote a brief about the skit. In a Wednesday letter to “Saturday Night Live” creator Lorne Michaels, the leader of the city’s police union expressed “great disappointment over the distorted representation” of Baltimore officers. Gene Ryan’s letter described Baltimore’s police department as a “very beleaguered agency” and suggested the skit could affect morale at a time when they’re “losing good and credible members daily.”