Financial News

AP Sports
April 23, 2018
AP-NC Newswatch
April 23, 2018
Financial News

 

 

Stocks gain…Hasbro looks for new outlets…Protesters can use ‘necessity defense’

 

NEW YORK (AP) – Stocks are higher as gains in technology stocks and retailers outweigh losses in energy companies. Microsoft rose 1 percent and Starbucks climbed 1.1 percent. Sears rose 2.7 percent after the company’s largest shareholder urged the struggling retailer to sell its Kenmore brand.

 

NEW YORK (AP) – With its sales falling due to the liquidation of Toys R Us, Hasbro is looking for new places to sell Monopoly, My Little Pony and its other toys. Hasbro says it will rely more on online sales, although it has also been working on getting its toys into more stores. CEO Brian Goldner says major retailers plan to increase their toy sections to lure former Toys R Us shoppers, which could benefit the toy maker. Hasbro says its revenue in the first three months of the year fell 16 percent to $716.3 million from a year ago.

 

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – The Minnesota Court of Appeals says four protesters can use an unusual “necessity defense” against criminal charges related to efforts to shut down two Enbridge Energy oil pipelines. The protesters admit that they turned the emergency shut-off valves on two pipelines in 2016 in Clearwater County of northwestern Minnesota as part of a multi-state protest. They want to tell jurors that the threat of climate change from Canadian tar sands crude is so imminent that they were justified.

 

BRUSSELS (AP) – The European Union is opening an investigation into Apple’s acquisition of song-recognition app Shazam to make sure it doesn’t limit consumer choice too much. Apple said in December it would buy the maker of the popular song-recognition app, which Apple’s digital assistant Siri had been competing with. EU Antitrust Commissioner Margrethe Vestager says the initial investigation hopes to “ensure that music fans will continue to enjoy attractive music streaming offers and won’t face less choice as a result of this proposed merger.”

 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – A federal appeals court says U.S. copyright law does not allow lawsuits claiming animals have copyrights to photographs. The case involved selfies taken by a monkey. The decision by the appeals court in San Francisco upheld a lower court ruling in favor David Slater, the photographer whose camera was used to take the photos. The appeals court said U.S. copyright law confers the right to sue on humans.

 

 

AP-WF-04-23-18 1823GMT